Being Right or Being Christ?

By: Jon Cassady

Ephesians 4:2

Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love.


Our workplaces give us plenty of opportunities to live out this scripture. In my years of employment, I’ve been challenged with being patient, humble and gentle. I must admit that I’m confident I’ve been a challenge to many as well!

I recently came across a picture on my computer of a former work associate, which I posted as a reminder to keep her in prayer. It caused me to give thanks to our Father for her and her son. Let’s call her Judy.

Judy was an extremely successful and driven single woman. To many coworkers, she came across as a self-seeking individual, desiring executive status at all costs. Her working behavior seemed negative, which was a challenge for many to endure. However, she was seeking advancement and career status as many of us were. To me, though, it appeared Judy was dealing with not only career issues, but was also hurting inside.

I recall many conversations where I felt she was not listening to me or anyone. Judy only wanted to be heard and to do what she wanted to do. I remember one conversation where I gently expressed my concern regarding her tone, style and inability to work with our team. She basically stated that she was going to continue to do what she had been doing because this had so far made her successful.

This difficult working relationship lasted for years. Then Judy became pregnant. As a single mother, she made a life-giving decision to raise her child alone. Her decision really convicted me. It caused me to increase my prayers for her and now her child. This increase in prayer resulted in a softening of my heart, which led me to be a more prayerful and patient coworker and peer.

Judy allowed me to be Christ to her and to serve her. It was no longer a conversation of who was right. Rather, prior to meetings, I would pray and ask that I could take on the image and likeness of Christ during our sessions.

Our Father and the Holy Spirit continued to do amazing things in me. Judy was no longer getting under my skin as quickly. I became more interested in her health, her child, her career and her spiritual well-being.

Judy was not attending any church. I recall asking myself whether I was the only image and likeness of Christ she might be experiencing. If so, then I needed to be more mindful of my conversations and actions. I was extremely convicted.

This began a transformation in both Judy and me. I was delighted to see a change in her life as she became more generous and selfless. Judy became a true friend, and we developed a lifelong relationship that was Christ-centered. It was more than being right – it was about being Christ.


TAKE THE CHALLENGE: Do I find myself caught up with being right rather than being Christ?